Cavity wall insulation is a great way to reduce the cost of your energy bills whilst improving the quality of your home comfort. Cavity wall insulation serves to reduce heat loss, and a handy bi product is the reduce noise transfer through walls, leaving you feeling extra snug and secure.

Cavity wall insulation is an epoxy foam that is pumped into the cavity of your walls. This stops draughts and air transfer as well as binding the walls together nicely. Many holes are drilled externally so that the foam does not need to be injected into one area alone. Multiple holes ease and assist the transfer through the cavity reducing friction, and increasing the likelihood of completely filling the cavity without leaving spaces.

Once the holes are drilled and the foam is filled entirely the compound is left to set and cure. Once cured any foam that escaped can now be trimmed off and the drilled out holes can be made good. It’s a little difficult on exposed brick homes as you can clearly see the drilling which is unfortunate but the benefits far outweigh the negative impact on aesthetics. If your home is rendered then the impact is minimal. The render is patch and then painted over leaving no visible marks from the installation of foam.

20% of heat is lost through walls and it is the second most important part of improving the conditions in your home. Loft Insulation being the only better value job pound for pound. I suggest you take a look at loft insulation first if you haven’t already.

This is the second largest heat loss area, second only to the loft. The cost of cavity wall insulation has risen dramatically in the last few years mainly because the amount the government will subsidise this important energy saving job has reduced significantly. Most homes that are large, will need to contribute more than the government now does if your unlucky. The costs contribution your end might range from £200 to £500. However much the cost, the job provides assured heating payback as well as making the home more comfortable. I highly recommend cavity insulation as long as your house brickwork does not suffer from damp or your in coastal areas.

The last remaining important factor to discuss is the quality of tradesman you use. There is a big difference between a poor and a good cavity wall installation. If your installer does not drill enough holes close together the chance of having pockets of air is quite high. You also must consider a good installation will have as smaller impact on the aesthetics of your home as is possible.